So little time

The old lament “So many books, so little time” that allegedly originated from Frank Zappa addresses a problem that the digital humanities hope to alleviate. However, as it begins to fix the problem of time consumption, there are concerns being raised over the research deficiencies that also follow. A close reading is the act of … Continue reading So little time

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Distant versus Close… or not?

The growth of digital tools and methods in the humanities has had implications for the ways scholars think about and interact with texts, what with the emergence of so-called “distant reading” techniques. Relying upon software programs that can scan and/or search for key terms within a given amount of text, distant reading excites certain researchers … Continue reading Distant versus Close… or not?

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In Defense of Digital Moderation

Technology is ever-increasing the ways in which we can view and research cultural artifacts, but is this a good thing? Before the widespread proliferation of the printing word, scholars could study near everything with relative ease. Books were expensive, and there wasn’t many of them. However, after book production exploded, it was far easier for … Continue reading In Defense of Digital Moderation

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What Do We Do: Distantly Read a million books or Closely Read a hundred?

“Close Reading,” as I would envision, would be a dissected analysis of a particular work; this particular work may be poetry, a scientific dissertation, or even an illustration. For example, for many years it has been debated what the song “And Your Bird Can Sing” is really about on the Beatles’ 1966 record, Revolver (debatably … Continue reading What Do We Do: Distantly Read a million books or Closely Read a hundred?

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How Knowledge is Accessed on the Internet by Thuso Motselebane

‘The result of the new filtering in the front is an increasingly smart network, with more hooks and ties by which we can find our way through it and make sense of what we find.’ –David Weinberger The innovation of digital information storage and access has changed the way we understand the body of knowledge … Continue reading How Knowledge is Accessed on the Internet by Thuso Motselebane

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Every Fact Has an Equal and Opposite Reaction

“We are witnessing a version of Newton’s Second Law: On the Net, every fact has an equal and opposite reaction. Those reactive facts may be dead wrong. Indeed, when facts truly contradict, at least one of them has to be wrong. But this continuous, multi-sided, linked contradiction of every fact changes the nature and role … Continue reading Every Fact Has an Equal and Opposite Reaction

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Education

” We don’t have to choose between them. Both have value. The Circle is a lump of qualified, sober experts. The Facebook page is a big, throbbing lump of people who want to talk about Heidegger for whatever reason. The two together form a loosely connected network of people who care about Heidegger. The participants … Continue reading Education

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Post 1

Knowledge is taking on the shape of the Net—that is, the Internet. Of all the different communication networks we’ve built for ourselves, with all their many shapes—the history of communication networks includes rings, hubs-and-spokes, stars, and more—the Net is the messiest. That gives it a crucial feature: It works at every scale. … Of course, … Continue reading Post 1

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The DIKW Pyramid and the Role of Forward Filtering

In short, Expert Labs is a conscious response to the fact that knowledge has rapidly gotten too big for its old container… Especially containers that are shaped like pyramids. The idea that you could gather data and information and then extract value from them by reducing them with every step upward now seems overly controlled … Continue reading The DIKW Pyramid and the Role of Forward Filtering

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Blog Post #1

“Filters no longer filter out. They filter forward, bringing their results to the front. What doesn’t make it through a filter is still visible and available in the background.” While reading and coming across this observation that the author makes, I couldn’t help but to think how true this statement resonates in regards of how … Continue reading Blog Post #1

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