re-configuring Weinberger’s “Too Big to Know”: experimenting with a meta-analysis

“Adventures in Digital Humanities” (Spring 2015) may be over as a formal course, but the adventures on the open web continue! Members of Dr. Katherine Pandora’s research group are thinking through how to unlock the further potential contained within the content the class created and shared via the class website and the group blogs we provided. (We set up these digital spaces thanks to OU Create.) Here is our first experiment: an analysis by Paul Kelly Vieth of David Weinberger’s Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren’t the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in…

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A smarter network than you?

Weinberger makes the point, over and over again, that “knowledge is becoming a property of the network, rather than of individuals who know things, of objects that contain knowledge, and of the traditional institutions that facilitate knowledge” (182). By attacking our epistemological assumptions, Weinberger is showing us just what the internet is capable of providing seekers … Continue reading A smarter network than you?

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tyrants tremble, media cartels disintegrate, and collaborative castles rise in the air

sure thing bro. Weinberger is careful to assign the above titular mentality to a caricature of technodeterminism, or technological optimism. Through that statement, among others, he carefully positions himself as a techno-realist. It seems from “Too Big to Know,” however, that the internet and the new ecology of knowledge it is creating is so potent … Continue reading tyrants tremble, media cartels disintegrate, and collaborative castles rise in the air

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The Bigger Picture

In David Weinberger’s Too Big To Know, he further discusses the largely disputed topic about having knowledge creation and circulation being based upon networked and open systems. Scientists, and scholars in general, really have no issues coming about with new factual information, but it’s the issue of connecting those newfound facts together. Bernard K. Forscher … Continue reading The Bigger Picture

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Final Blog Post on Too Big to Know.

“What we’ve discussed so far in this book should lead us to hypothesize that scientific knowledge is taking on properties of its new, becoming, like the network in which it lives: (1) huge, (2) less hierarchical, (3) more continuously public, (4) less centrally filtered, (5) more open to differences, and (6) hyperlinked.” Weinberger (153) Chapter … Continue reading Final Blog Post on Too Big to Know.

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up, up my friends! or the tables turned. or, what can your computer teach you about poetry?

As we discussed text-mining and textual analysis earlier this semester and considered what kinds of  new frameworks can be generated through digital methods, one of the examples we looked at is a wordset generated by Ted Underwood, of “words that are consistently more common in works by William Wordwoth than in other poets from 1780 to 1850.” The odds of a single scholar deriving this list are likely slim to none (and slim just left town), and even an extensive team of scholars managing this feat without computational power is highly unlikely. In visualizing the list Underwood used Wordle’s graphic…

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Openness

The Internet is like a big playground, and it just seems to be getting bigger. More and more people are joining conversations in the Internet and some are wondering if certain people should be allowed to play or not. This openness has allowed people that were previously untrusted with knowledge to gain access to tools, … Continue reading Openness

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Global Digital Humanities: Qs for 3.26 class discussion

Propose 1-3 questions, based on the practicalities, goals, rationales, and/or challenges of global digital humanities and/or Dr. Gil’s own pathway and interventions on this score, in response to the course prep materials for this week. Links below. Share those questions by adding them in the comments section to this blog post. The questions should be ones … Continue reading Global Digital Humanities: Qs for 3.26 class discussion

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Global Digital Humanities: Qs for 3.26 class discussion

Propose 1-3 questions, based on the practicalities, goals, rationales, and/or challenges of global digital humanities and/or Dr. Gil’s own pathway and interventions on this score, in response to the course prep materials for this week. Links below. Share those qs by adding them in the comments section to this post. The questions should be ones that … Continue reading Global Digital Humanities: Qs for 3.26 class discussion

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Global Digital Humanities: Qs for 3.26 class discussion

Propose 1-3 questions, based on the practicalities, goals, rationales, and/or challenges of global digital humanities and/or Dr. Gil’s own pathway and interventions on this score, in response to the course prep materials for this week. Links below. Share those qs by adding them in the comments section to this post. The questions should be ones that … Continue reading Global Digital Humanities: Qs for 3.26 class discussion

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Balance

“A state in which different things occur in equal or proper amounts or have an equal or proper amount of importance”—this is Merriam-Webster’s definition of balance. The issue that suggests that close reading and distant reading dwell in a sort of unfavorable contrariety is really a matter of concern over how to balance their unique … Continue reading Balance

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Close and Distant Readings Commensurate with Close and Distant Writings

  It occurs to me that one consideration regarding close and distant reading is that there are limitations of “zoom” based on the work itself. The closeness or distance with which a work can be read must be commensurate with the level of minute detail and symbolic density (for close reading) or abstract generalization (for … Continue reading Close and Distant Readings Commensurate with Close and Distant Writings

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Close and Distant Reading: A Look Into the Future

One of the core values of the humanities, especially the part that focuses on literature is “close reading”.  Close reading is a careful interpretation of text with emphasis on particular details such as individual words, syntax, and the order in which sentences and ideas unfold as they are read. This practice helps the reader get a better … Continue reading Close and Distant Reading: A Look Into the Future

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